Psalm 107

 

Read: Psalm 107:1 – 3; Psalm 136; 1 Chronicles 16:34; 2 Chronicles 7:3, 7

Psalm 107 is a psalm of thanksgiving composed to be sung by those who returned from captivity. The psalm calls for those so delivered to witness to their deliverance and to thank God for His goodness and because His mercy endures forever. “Let the redeemed of the Lord say so” – “redeemed” is the Hebrew gaw-al, referring to the one ransomed by the kinsman-redeemer.  We were in bondage, someone else owned us; God bought us back.

Think About It: From what kind of bondage has Christ redeemed me? Where and when do I have the opportunity, as a person redeemed of the Lord, to “say so?” Do I take those opportunities?

Prayer: Thank God for His goodness and for His eternal mercy.

 

Read: Psalm 107:4 – 9

Psalm 107 presents four harrowing types of experience from which God provides miraculous and compassionate deliverance.  These categories refer to real-life experiences, but can also be viewed as symbolic of human dilemmas. The first category which requires God’s deliverance is that of wanderers in the wilderness. The Hebrew word for “wander” means to lose your way or to be misdirected. It is not the carefree experience of the “happy wanderer,” but the experience of stumbling into a land without food or water with no safe place to rest.

Think About It: According to Psalm 107:6 – 9, what did God do to save these wanderers? How are they supposed to respond to God’s salvation? How have I wandered in the wilderness? How have I experienced God’s deliverance?

Prayer: Thank God for His goodness and His wonderful works.

 

Read: Psalm 107:10 – 16; Romans 5:6 – 8

The second category of distress from which God delivers His people is that of prisoners in bondage. According to v. 11, their bondage was of their own doing, because they rebelled against God’s words and despised His advice.  We can readily imagine God, in His goodness, being willing to rescue the hostage and the victim, but God’s goodness extends far beyond what is reasonable. God is willing to rescue the rebellious and undeserving.

Think About It: According to Psalm 107:13 – 16, what did God do to deliver the prisoners? How have I experienced “darkness and the shadow of death” in my life? How have I experienced God’s deliverance from bondage?

Prayer: Praise God for His goodness and His wonderful works.

 

Read: Psalm 107:17 – 22; James 5:14 – 16; Psalm 30:2; Isaiah 53:5

The third category of distress from which God delivers men is that of those afflicted because of their sins. Not all illness is a result of personal sin, but there is a “sickness unto chastisement.”  The situation of those who suffer thus is described simply: they abhor their food and draw near to death.  The purpose of the “sickness unto chastisement” is to bring about repentance, and this is what happened: “they cried unto the Lord in their trouble.”

Think About It: According to Psalm 107:19 – 20, what did God do to save them? What is the significance of the phrase, “He sent His word”? How does God’s word lead to healing and deliverance? How are men to respond to God’s deliverance from the sickness unto chastisement?

Prayer: Praise God for His goodness and His wonderful works.

 

Read: Psalm 107:23- 32; Mark 4:39; Psalm 89:9

The fourth category of distress from which God delivers men is that of “those who go down to the sea in ships.”  Each of the previous three categories involves the consequences of transgression. Those who wandered in the wilderness went astray; those who were in bondage had ignored God; those who were afflicted were suffering chastisement for their sins. This fourth category does not imply any wrongdoing on the part of the sufferers. They are simply going about their business on the sea, and get caught in a terrible storm raised by God’s wind.

Think About It: How does Psalm 107:24 – 27 describe the troubles of those who are caught in the storm?  How does this trouble correlate to the ups and downs of life? How did God deliver them from their trouble? How are men to respond to God’s deliverance from the storms of life?

Prayer: Praise God for His goodness and His wonderful works.

 

Read: Psalm 107:29 – 30; 2 Timothy 4:8; Matthew 25:21, 34; Psalm 16:11

God’s deliverance of “those who go down to the sea in ships” involves a wonderful image. God calms the storm, brings gladness to the storm-tossed mariners, and brings them to their desired haven. The Hebrew word for “desired” means not just “where they wanted to go” but “delightful.”

Think About It: How have I experienced God’s deliverance from the storms of life? What is my desired haven?

Prayer: Thank God for the hope of glory.

 

Read: Psalm 107:33 – 43

The last section of Psalm 107 examines God’s sovereignty over the world and the affairs of men.

Think About It: According to Psalm 107:33 – 43, how does God shape the flow of history? According to Psalm 107:42, how are we to respond to this work of God?

Prayer: Praise God for His lovingkindess.

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